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Why Should Clients Choose You?

All designers want to get to the point in their career where they can call the shots and work with the clients they want to work with. But how do you get there? By being the kind of designer (and businessperson) that clients consistently want to work with.

In this episode, we’re joined for a second time by branding expert Terri Trespicio. Terri dishes out some pretty amazing advice on how to figure out exactly what you do, how to communicate that with your clients, and how to make them care.

Only by conveying a unique value to your prospects can you expect to stand out and generate enough interest to propel you to where you can call the shots.

We also answer a new listener question about the ethics and logistics of adding projects (where you had a limited revisionist role) to your portfolio.

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Finding Design Clients Through Social Media

As creative solopreneurs or agency owners, there are no shortage of ways to find great clients. We can attend networking mixers, send out emails, or rely on good old-fashioned word of mouth. But one we keep getting one particular question time and time again — how do you use the power of social media to find new business?

This week, we are joined by social media expert, (don’t call him a guru!) Josh Hoffman. Josh teaches us the importance of establishing your brand on social media, how to put yourself in front of the right people, and what to say and do once you have their attention.

Josh also talks about the importance of the principle of playing “the long game” with potential clients, and the concept of “killing them with content.” There are a million great tips in this episode, so you won’t want to miss a second.

We also answer a new listener question about how to make your design resumé stand out to potential employers.

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When Your Clients Aren’t Feeling It

Have you ever had an unsatisfied client? At some point, I think every designer has run into this problem. It’s how you deal with it that matters.

This episode was spurred on by a listener question we got from a designer who’s client went completely off-the-grid after things went south. Not knowing what to do next, naturally she wrote to us!

Join us as we talk about how we have found ourselves in similar situations over the years, and what we did about it. More importantly, listen for our tips you can use from the beginning of a project to help minimize the risk of this happening to you.

We also answer another listener question about how to outsource those pesky “small jobs” for your web design clients.

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apple tips for designers

Apple Workflow Tips

If you’re like most designers out there, your work machine of choice is a Mac. And if you’re like most Mac users, you have a pretty good handle on your workflow, but there is always room for improvement.

On today’s episode, we are joined by Apple consultant (and Mikelle’s new bff) Brett Nord. Brett is here to teach us all about how to make the most of our Macs, from how to maximize their longevity, to how to automate mindless tasks. All you have to worry about is what you’re going to do with all your newfound free time!

As always, we also answer a new listener question about how much to reveal when a client asks you to participate in the “debrief” process after a project.

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reality check freelance projects

Reality Checking Your Freelance Design Work

The life of a freelance graphic/web designer can be incredibly rewarding. The independence of working for yourself is alluring, but working by yourself comes with more than a few drawbacks. With nobody to bounce ideas off of, or show your works in progress to, how do you ever really know if you’re on the right track?

In this episode, the gang talks about all the ways we can make sure our projects never lose sight of the original objectives and goals. We talk about ways to keep things on track, as well as how to get extra eyeballs on your work to make sure you’re actually connecting to the intended audience.

We also riff a bit about MasterCard’s new logo (ay-yay-yay…) and we tackle a new listener question about leaving the 9-5 world to strike out on your own — with a partner.

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graphic designers secret weapons

Our Newest Secret Weapons

One of the greatest joys of being a designer is when you discover something new that changes your life for the better. While change can be scary, it can also open you up to a whole new world of possibilities.

In this episode, the gang each talks about one such discovery that they use to increase productivity and creativity in their day-to-day. Whether you work primarily in web, or print, you will find something interesting here.

We also answer a new listener question from a non-web-designer, and whether she should learn it, or simply partner with a web pro in order to offer it as a service to clients.

2016 Logo Design Trends Show Links:

2016 logo design trends

2016 Logo Design Trends Report

What designer doesn’t love discovering the latest trends? And who doesn’t love a good tradition? Well hold onto your hats, kids, this episode has BOTH! Yep, sitting down with LogoLounge‘s Bill Gardner to discuss the latest trends in logo design has become one of Deeply Graphic’s most time-honored traditions. And this one doesn’t disappoint.

Follow along with the trend report, which can be found here

In this episode, we go over all the top trends Bill has discovered while poring over countless logo entries. There are quite a few interesting logo design trends, as well as some natural evolutions of trends we have seen in the past. Whether you like them all or not, you’ll definitely learn something here.

And as always, we answer a new listener question about some of the best ways to pick up extra, small design projects.

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deeply graphic live show

DesignCast 110: The LIVE Show!

Our last live show was so much fun that we’re continuing the tradition, answering your questions live! But if you missed the show, no worries, you can catch up with it now.

In this jam-packed episode, the gang answers an insane number of listener questions — some personal, some professional — all while saying goodbye to sobriety.

Remember, we’re going to try to do live shows like this every ten episodes, so if you missed our last two, no excuses next time!

You can either listen to the audio-only feed as usual, or watch the video below for the closest thing to the real live experience.

 

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The Slow Times

All creative professionals have ups and downs — it’s just a part of the life. It’s how we choose to use that time that will make or break your business.

In this episode, the gang talks about nine things you can do with your time between clients that will actually help you get more of them, and streamline your workflow for maximum efficiency.  There is a lot of ground covered here, so you won’t want to miss this one.

We also answer a listener question about how you can best spend 10-15 hours per week on setting your freelance business up for success.

Be sure to join us for our next LIVE listener question show on May 31 @ 6pm Pacific, 9 Eastern.

Come with all of your questions and we will do our best to get through all of them! Just go to thedeependdesign.com/live

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how to be a design consultant

Design Consulting as a Service

As graphic and web designers, we do a lot of behind-the-scenes work that we don’t always charge for. But what if we did?

In this episode, we expand upon a listener question to talk about the topic of charging clients for all those little things we do that don’t count as “design” work. Things like reading and responding to emails, meetings, and even upfront discovery. We also talk about the idea of breaking consulting off as a separate stand-alone service you can offer to clients. It’s a great way to demonstrate your value, and get away from being a commodity-driven business.

We also answer a listener question about transitioning from a 9-5job that offers a tiny bit of design responsibility to a full-fledged design role/ solopreneur.

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