Graphic Design Podcast :: The Deeply Graphic DesignCast

Where Are All the Clients?

Where Are All the Clients?

What’s the biggest roadblock between you and freelance success? Clients. Specifically, GOOD ones. Lets be honest, good clients keep the bills paid and the lights on, so you need to know where to find them. In this episode, the gang digs deep into their personal experience and talks about how to find awesome graphic design clients. Because without them, you’re not so much a freelancer as unemployed.

We also answer a listener question about crowd-sourcing, and we have a new round of helpful tips in store for you in this week’s “Do Yourself a Favor.”

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(7) responses

Mauricio Vega

August 20, 2012

Great show!! I always appreciate all the useful links and ideas you talk about. About finding clients, I recently spotted on some jobs opportunities, like for different business having a better web site to fill their needs, or new bussiness that can use some branding, etc. How do you approach to the these potencial clients to offer your services? Is this a good idea to find new clients?

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Wes McDowell

August 21, 2012

Hi Mauricio, I’m sorry but I don’t understand the question… Are you asking if its good to apply to job postings?

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Jonathan Kent

August 29, 2012

I think Mauricio is talking about making a “cold call”, where he directly solicits a potential client.

While not the most effective way to find clients, it can be a great way of showing a that you have initiative … as long as you don’t come across too desperate!

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    Mauricio Vega

    August 30, 2012

    Hi Jonathan, that´s what I was asking about. Sorry Wes if it wasn´t clear. I agree that it isn´t very effective but at least I showed my work around. How do you start getting clients when you are starting up your business? I experienced that some clients don´t hire you because you don´t have “enough” experience, even if you are capable of doing what they asked for.

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      Wes McDowell

      September 1, 2012

      Mauricio: That’s the catch-22 of starting out doing anything. It usually just means that you will have to start out with smaller projects for less money, and as you get more experience, (and more work samples to prove it,) you can step up to better clients with bigger budgets. And as Kristi mentioned in the podcast, working out trades with local businesses is a great way to start building up your portfolio.

      I have heard cold-calling works for a lot of people, but I have personally never had the intestinal fortitude to do that. The thought of calling strangers and giving them the hard sell sounds like torture to me.

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Durand

November 28, 2012

I really enjoy the show. I am a print designer trying to learn web design on my own. I have always ignored any job postings that have mentioned web design as one of the qualifications. After listening to this episode I was wondering if I should look into these positions further? Or would it be a waste of my time if they have web design in the job description? The extent of my knowledge in web design is creating the layout as a layered Photoshop file. So I have no idea how to deal with html, css, or web basics. Thanks for any advice.

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    Wes McDowell

    December 1, 2012

    Hi Durand, thanks for listening! I would say if the position lists web DESIGN as a requirement, it sounds like you are well versed in that, and you should apply. If they ask for development, or anything that would put you in a position of having to do more than you are comfortable with, then pass on it. There are still employers who are looking for the holy grail: designers who can code. But a lot of them are getting wise to the fact that they are better off splitting the two jobs up.

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