Should You Publish Prices on Your Website?

Video Transcript:

Should you put prices on your website?

This is a great question, especially for service businesses because obviously if you sell products, you’re going to have your prices right there on your website because people have to know exactly what they’re buying on your website, but for service businesses, particularly if you offer a several different services, it can become a little more ambiguous, especially if every job is different and you need more information from your client in order to build out a quote.

So while it’s not always possible to actually list out hard prices on your website, I do think it’s very important to at least address your prices on your site. In this video, I’m going to show you why it’s so important and a few ways to get around some common sticking points that may have been stopping you from publishing your prices in the past. All right, so let’s talk about why it’s so important to, uh, to post your prices on your site. So basically, and with any website, it’s all about delivering a good user experience, which means delivering exactly what people expect to find on your site, which includes pricing, you know, your customers or clients expect to see pricing on your website the same way that you expect to see pricing when you’re in research mode, trying to, to come up with a service provider or try to find someone to help you with something you’re going through.

And in the old days, information was much more closely guarded. You know, businesses never wanted to give up any kind of anything they would consider to be a trade secret or the would harm their negotiating power, but today information is so much more readily available and if your customers are looking for pricing information, they’re going to find it. They can either find it from you or from one of your competitors. Now, one common mistake I still see so many service businesses make is they want to make their customers fill out a form to request a quote, but the problem with that is you know your customers these days are a lot more savvy than they used to be and they know exactly what you’re trying to do there. They know that you’re just really trying to tee up a sales call, which they may not be ready for.

I guess you don’t want people calling you at home. Well, now you know how I feel, so unless they’re already pretty sure that they want to work with you, they’re not going to fill out your form or they’re not going to call you for that pricing info. They’re just going to move on to the next result they see in the search, which is going to be one of your competitors to see what pricing info they can find there, so you actually want to show your information even if your competitors don’t, because if they do and you don’t, you’re basically going to be taking yourself right out of the running from the get go, but if your competition doesn’t show their pricing info, you still want to because you want to be the one who shows your pricing info because it gives you several key advantages.

It basically lets you set the expectation for the pricing of your service and secondly, since so many people are searching Google for pricing info on what you do, your pricing page can actually act as a landing page that people can discover your business through. So let’s say you’re an event planner. You know I’m sure there are definitely people who are googling event planner pricing in your city. So if you have that pricing page optimized on your site, you can get quite a few potential clients who are finding you through that page. Now the next reason is all about credibility, you know, in 2019 with so much information readily available out there, anything you hold back is just going to seem kind of shady to the average person. They’ll assume you just want to pitch them with that sales call or even worse, they might assume you actually change your pricing from client to client based on how much you think you can get out of them.

And that’s not something you want anyone thinking about the way you do business. So by publishing your prices in a straightforward way, it just makes people trust you, which is huge. The next reason, and this is a big one, uh, it helps you prequalify prospects. No, I can tell you from my own experience that before I started publishing my pricing, um, I’d waste a lot of time with the wrong kinds of prospects on the phone who had no idea what website consulting or in your website was really going to cost. So basically it’s been 15 minutes on the phone with someone hearing all about what they need, only for them to get sticker shock when they found out exactly how much the services cost. Now this is obviously a big waste of time for both people involved, for me and for that potential client. So publishing those prices actually accomplished two things, you know, basically it weeded out the people who were never going to be able to afford the service and for the people who could afford it and wanted to spend a little bit more in a more premium service by seeing that pricing there that’s in line with what they were already thinking in their head, it really told them that this is the service for me and I’m in the right place.

Okay, so now that you know all the reasons why it’s important to share your prices on your site, let’s talk about some best practices. In some ways you can actually go about this. So the first thing I want to talk about is, let’s say you’re pricing is above or even below the industry average. You know, you’re gonna wanna. Use Your pricing page to not only display your prices, but to kind of talk about a little bit why they are the way they are and give a little bit of justification to it. And one common way of doing that is to use price anchoring, which is basically putting your prices in context with your competition. So with price anchoring, you’re basically just showing the benefits of what people are going to get with your service that they wouldn’t get with a lower priced option. Another way of price anchoring involves a multiple price tiers, some of which are well above your normal core service.

That basically by comparison, makes what you’re normally offers seem much more affordable. So if you’re a wedding photographer and your normal packages and rider right around $4,000, maybe you offer a $10,000 package that’s just well above and beyond. That offers much more so that people see that and they think, I could never afford that. But then they see the $4,000 package and they say, oh, I could probably afford that. So those are just a few ways to use price anchoring to your advantage and it’s also important to keep in mind if your prices are higher than your competition, your website itself needs to reflect that. So in other words, if your website looks cheap, it’s going to be really hard to sell view as expensive. And finally, what if you can’t really list out your prices because you’re pricing is customized based on the needs of your clients.

You know, I can’t really list out actual hard prices on, on the deep ends website because there’s so many variables, you know, every website’s different with different functionalities, but I list out ballpark ranges which can actually be pretty broad in themselves, but at least with that can still do, is eliminate a lot of the people whose budgets fall well below those ballpark ranges or an alternative to ballpark pricing. We’d just be using the verbiage starting at. So you basically would say services starting at dot, dot, dot, and then just list out some of the factors that will contribute to that specific price. All right, so now I want to hear from you and I want to know are you going to start publishing your prices on your website after hearing all of this, um, why or why not? And you can leave that over along with any other questions or comments you have in the comment section below.

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